Due Diligence

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Do Research
Due Diligence

His Letter

Do homework when voting

The two political parties that attempt to govern the country are farther apart than at any time I can recall. There was a time we could agree to disagree and had the decorum to allow political dissention and still be civilin our differences. That seems like a lifetime ago.

When you stop and think, 535 individuals (Democrats and Republicans), the president and his cabinet, coupled with state and local representation, control how you live your life and progress accordingly. Faint faith in Washington politics and the mess we find ourselves in can be laid at their door.

Afghanistan,our allies, inflation at a 30-year high, supply chain bottlenecks, energy, indoctrination/education, crime, COVID, the border. There are no present issues that do not affect us all in some manner. How did this country put itself in this position and how do we repair it? Do your homework. Keep in mind your vote is very relevant. Do some research. Be aware of how a politician aligns with your beliefs, and vote accordingly.

And to point, why are we still beholden to foreign entities for PPE, pharmaceuticals and items for every day necessary commerce? Have we learned nothing through this pandemic? As a ountry, are we that naive to think once all this passes, all will be correct in the world? American industries do not get a pass on this as with life in a global economy, and I understand these companies found greater margins by farming their products to foreign manufacturers. Now they are paying the price and that is borne out by Americans in the lack of necessary products and services.

And now we have an administration that seems to believe that as Americans, our consumer expectations may be too high. Really? I would like to think this period of time is an anomaly and we will get through it and back to what Americans think as normal. The struggles of this country are not insurmountable. Elections have consequences and we need to be cognizant of who and how we vote. Positive times are ahead if take the initiative to pay attention, do our due diligence and put those in positions that align with overdue corrective measures.


Ed Romatowski

Findlay

My Response


Due diligence

I find myself in agreement with the letter titled "Do homework when voting" (Feb. 5). I would prefer the headline was "Do homework before voting," but other than that, I agree with the sentiment that due diligence should be done before casting a ballot.

Since such diligence involves two activities I love to do—research and voting—I had to chime in. The first thing to remember when engaging in either activity is that you can have your own opinions and beliefs, but you can't have your own facts. Facts are immutable.

I believe one of the first principles to which we should hold our elected officials and candidates is to speak the truth even if it means admitting ignorance of a particular issue. I am not referring to accidental misstatements. I am talking about baldfaced lies.

There are cases where the facts are apparent, such as events one witnessed firsthand. I and millions of others witnessed a mob violently attacking police officers to gain entrance to and deface the U.S. Capitol. I heard and read transcripts of the testimony of Capitol and D.C. police officers who recounted being attacked with batons, flagpoles, fire extinguishers and brass-knuckled fists. So when someone claims it was a "legitimate political discourse," I know he or she is lying, and I will vote accordingly.

I researched the claims of election fraud, read many of the judicial decisions on lawsuits brought concerning alleged election fraud, and listened to the election officials testifying to the accuracy of the results of the election and numerous recounts. So when people claim the 2020 election was stolen, I know they are lying, and I will vote accordingly.

I intend to hold the liars accountable, and I believe it must be done for our future, for the future of our republic and the future of our now fragile democracy. Do the research prior to voting.


Bruce Workman

Findlay
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Bruce Workman

Bruce Workman

Bruce is a retired rubber chemist. He is the former publisher, editor and head writer for the county Democratic Party newsletter.

He is currenty a freelance writer, and a political activist. Bruce likes to read, research, write, design this website, and fish.

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